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RISE Gallery is a window into the art and research outputs of Sarah Bissett Scott, artist and regeneration consultant.

Sarah's B&W photographs of places and people spring from living in North Kensington while establishing her professional credentials and studying at the Architectural Association. These images later informed her research into 'spatial justice' which developed through a number of years working in local authorities seeking funding and programming regeneration projects for communities, mainly in the Midlands, South and East of England.

These photographic records of London's W11 are contrasted with more recent photographs, charcoal portraits and abstractions.

Speaking in Abstractions

Sarah's art gathers different mediums for further understandings of communities and people and places: some of her charcoal portraits and abstractions were displayed at 'It's Only Black and White' for OPEN STUDIOS 2022 and 'Inside Out' for BIG MAKERS FAIR early in 2023. A new turn of exploring quick-shot pictures of buildings, people and places, extracted into abstract paintings, was shown at the BIG ART FAIR in June.

This theme is being expanded at OPEN STUDIOS - the 2023 edition - September-October this year: Details at the HVAF (Herts Visual Arts Forum) website

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Future Scape: 2023 is puzzling me (and maybe a lot of other people too). Why analyse the basis of present problems while looking for future solutions. Consider 'future ruins' - what will last from today's regeneration schemes? Urban designers bring their focus down into balancing the complex demands of progress, spatial equity, accessibility. Some people are excluded. This is an image named 'Garden of Memory'. Its reality housed a thousand lives lost when travelling from Libya to Italy and the ship sank. It was retrieved and controversially used as an allegorical sculpture at the Venice Biennale 2019.  Our thoughts are with the families of those lost as we reflect on small boats that show beautiful images and rise to unresolved political challenges for 'spatial justice'.  

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